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Julia A Licholai

Neurobiology

Brown University

I am a PhD student characterizing neurons that control reflexes. I have worked in a range of neurobiology labs studying cell regeneration in zebrafish, food intake in mice, and information processing in monkeys. These experiences help guide my writing and art.

Julia has authored 1 article

A new molecule and an under-appreciated neuron have been implicated in Parkinson's disease

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Researchers studying Parkinson’s disease pivot from the usual dopamine story and reveal a new mechanism underlying early motor deficits

Julia A Licholai

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Can slime molds remember?

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Unique signals may propagate through the slime mold's tendrils when they reach food

A controversial new study shows how male rats can become pregnant and give birth

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Scientists have debated whether the scientific progress justified the invasiveness of the procedure

Researchers are mapping how information about what we eat travels from our guts to our brains

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Research in mice shows that different nutrients each activate specific nerves

An accidental experiment discovered new cells in cat brains and led to a Nobel Prize

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Cats looking at dots inside a tent revealed the different eye cells that process movement and light

Julia has left Comment 5 peer comments

How scientists developed the most popular anesthetic used today, without totally knowing how it works

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The "milk of amnesia" is relatively new, and is predated by centuries of weak attempts at pain relief

Josseline Ramos-Figueroa

Comment 1 peer comment

Scientists must speak out against misinformation about "immune-boosting" supplements

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Dietary supplements can be dangerous, despite what social media influencers say

Shelby Bradford

Comment 3 peer comments

New research shows how one sniff separates trillions of molecules into smells

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These new findings could explain how humans are capable of detecting over a trillion odors

Thiago Arzua

Comment 2 peer comments

How a mislabeled wolf skull spurred an erroneous scientific conclusion

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A cautionary tale about what happens when museum specimens are incorrectly labeled

Jazmin Murphy

Comment 1 peer comment

A smell test can predict whether unresponsive patients will recover

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Smell could be the key to predicting recovery paths for people after brain injuries

Thiago Arzua

Comment 3 peer comments